Chief Secretary writes Minster of Legal Affairs on the regularisation of land titles in Tobago

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Chief Secretary Orville London
The regularisation of land titles in Tobago has apparently been put on the back burner of the Central Government.

A committee appointed by the Legal Affairs Minister Prakash Ramadar and headed by Tobago Development Vernella Alleyne-Toppin in December 2010 has reportedly not met since July 2011.

THA Chief Secretary Orville London wrote Ramadar yesterday (Thursday March 1 2012) requesting a status report on the controversial issue.

London recalled that when the People’s Partnership Government assumed office in May 2010, the Agriculture Ministry was leading the process for the rationalisation of land use in Tobago, through the enactment of the Land Adjudication Act No 14 of 2000; Land Tribunal Act No 15 of 2000; the Registration to Title of Land Act No 16 of 2000 and other relevant legislation.

He said the committee was appointed with the specific mandate to “propose appropriate recommendations for regularising land title in Tobago” and reminded the Minister that in his discussions with him, the commitment was made that the issue will be given the urgent attention that it deserved.

London told the Minister that he was extremely concerned that, after more than 14 months, the committee had not even provided an interim report and this concern was further heightened when the THA representative on the committee, Senior State Counsel Alvin Pascall indicated that, as far as he was aware, the committee had not met since July 2011.

“I am surprised and disappointed that the critical issue of the Regularisation of Land Title in Tobago could be treated in this cavalier manner,” London said. In urging the Minister to do everything possible to ensure that the committee carried out its mandate effectively and expeditiously, London said he remained available to collaborate with him and his officers in any initiative that would lead to a speedy resolution of this longstanding issue.

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